Professor Lynnette Robin Ferguson

D.Phil. (Oxon.), DSc., QSO, FNZIFST

Biography

Lynnette Ferguson obtained her D.Phil. from Oxford University, working on the subject of DNA damage, DNA repair and mutagenesis in yeast.  After her return to New Zealand, she began working as part of the Auckland Cancer Society Research Centre, using mutagenicity testing as a predictor of carcinogenesis, with particular focus on the New Zealand situation. In 2000, she took on a 50% role as Head of a new Discipline of Nutrition at The University of Auckland.  In more recent years, she has considered the interplay between genes and diet in the development of chronic disease, with particular focus on Inflammatory Bowel Disease, a cancer-prone condition, and also in prostate cancer.  As programme leader for the multidisciplinary-multiorganisation Nutrigenomics New Zealand, she has been working with a range of others to bring nutrigenomics tools and potential to the New Zealand science scene.  She has supervised more than 40 students to the successful completion of B.tech, MSc or PhD.  Her laboratory regularly supervises 2-3 summer students each year.  She is the author or co-author of more than 350 peer reviewed publications as chapters in books or articles in international journals.  She serves on the Editorial Boards of several major journals.

Research | Current

Lynnette's current research considers the interplay between genes and diet in the development of chronic disease, with particular focus on Inflammatory Bowel Disease, a cancer-prone condition and also in both colorectal and prostate cancer.   As programme leader for the multidisciplinary-multiorganisation Nutrigenomics New Zealand, she has worked with a range of others across The university of Auckland, Plant and Food Research and Agresearch Ltd, to bring nutrigenomics tools and potential to the New Zealand science scene. http://www.nutrigenomics.org.nz/ Research interests: Gene-diet interactions in the development of chronic disease, Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, Colorectal cancer, Prostate cancer

Teaching | Current

Course coordinator MEDSCI709 and MEDSCI710, offers projects for MEDSCI701 and 702

Distinctions/Honours

Queens Service Order in Public Health,

Fellow, New Zealand Institute of Food Science and Technology

Selected publications and creative works (Research Outputs)

  • Ferguson, L. R., Chen, H., Collins, A. R., Connell, M., Damia, G., Dasgupta, S., ... Amin, A. (2015). Genomic instability in human cancer: Molecular insights and opportunities for therapeutic attack and prevention through diet and nutrition. Seminars in cancer biology, 35 Suppl, S5-24. 10.1016/j.semcancer.2015.03.005
  • Marlow, G., Han, D. Y., Wickens, K., Stanley, T., Crane, J., Mitchell, E. A., ... Ferguson, L. R. (2015). Differential effects of two probiotics on the risks of eczema and atopy associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms to Toll-like receptors. Pediatric allergy and immunology : official publication of the European Society of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, 26 (3), 262-271. 10.1111/pai.12371
    Other University of Auckland co-authors: Edwin Mitchell
  • Goyette, P., Boucher, G., Mallon, D., Ellinghaus, E., Jostins, L., Huang, H., ... Hauser, S. L. (2015). High-density mapping of the MHC identifies a shared role for HLA-DRB1*01:03 in inflammatory bowel diseases and heterozygous advantage in ulcerative colitis. Nature genetics, 47 (2), 172-179. 10.1038/ng.3176
  • Bishop, K. S., & Ferguson, L. R. (2015). The interaction between epigenetics, nutrition and the development of cancer. Nutrients, 7 (2), 922-947. 10.3390/nu7020922
    Other University of Auckland co-authors: Karen Bishop
  • Folkard, D. L., Marlow, G., Mithen, R. F., & Ferguson, L. R. (2015). Effect of Sulforaphane on NOD2 via NF-κB: implications for Crohn's disease. Journal of inflammation (London, England), 1210.1186/s12950-015-0051-x
  • Bishop, K. S., Erdrich, S., Karunasinghe, N., Han, D. Y., Zhu, S., Jesuthasan, A., & Ferguson, L. R. (2015). An investigation into the association between DNA damage and dietary fatty acid in men with prostate cancer. Nutrients, 7 (1), 405-422. 10.3390/nu7010405
    URL: http://hdl.handle.net/2292/25889
    Other University of Auckland co-authors: Karen Bishop, Nishi Karunasinghe
  • Erdrich, S., Bishop, K. S., Karunasinghe, N., Han, D. Y., & Ferguson, L. R. (2015). A pilot study to investigate if New Zealand men with prostate cancer benefit from a Mediterranean-style diet. PeerJ, 310.7717/peerj.1080
    Other University of Auckland co-authors: Karen Bishop, Nishi Karunasinghe
  • Ahmed Nasef, N., Mehta, S., Powell, P., Marlow, G., Wileman, T., & Ferguson, L. R. (2015). Extracts of Feijoa Inhibit Toll-Like Receptor 2 Signaling and Activate Autophagy Implicating a Role in Dietary Control of IBD. PloS one, 10 (6)10.1371/journal.pone.0130910

Contact details

Primary location

M&HS BUILDING 504 - Bldg 504
Level 2, Room 239
85 PARK RD
GRAFTON
AUCKLAND 1023
New Zealand