Dr John Cirillo

B.Hlth. Sc. (Hons), Ph.D., University of Adelaide, Australia

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Research Fellow

Research | Current

Dr. John Cirillo is currently a postdoctoral research fellow focusing on neuromodulation and neural plasticity, neurorehabilitation, neurophysiology and human brain imaging relevant to recovery of motor function after stroke. He has previously examined the neurophysiology of corticospinal function following incomplete spinal cord injury to better understand the generation of voluntary movement following neurological insult, aimed to support the development of novel and more effective therapeutic interventions after injury. He is also interested, and has been involved, in factors that influence neuroplasticity in human motor cortex, such as regular physical activity, brain hemispheres, ageing, and a common genetic polymorphism on the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene, that have the ability to influence recovery from various central nervous system injuries.

Distinctions/Honours

2017 Aotearoa Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship

2014 Fritz Krauth Memorial Award (Paralyzed Veterans of America Postdoctoral Fellowship)

Areas of expertise

Motor Cortex Plasticity

Movement Neuroscience

Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

Selected publications and creative works (Research Outputs)

  • Mooney, R. A., Cirillo, J., Stinear, C. M., & Byblow, W. D. (2020). Neurophysiology of motor skill learning in chronic stroke. Clinical neurophysiology : official journal of the International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology, 131 (4), 791-798. 10.1016/j.clinph.2019.12.410
    Other University of Auckland co-authors: Cathy Stinear, Winston Byblow
  • Wadsley, C. G., Cirillo, J., & Byblow, W. D. (2019). Between-hand coupling during response inhibition. Journal of neurophysiology, 122 (4), 1357-1366. 10.1152/jn.00310.2019
    Other University of Auckland co-authors: Winston Byblow
  • Mooney, R. A., Cirillo, J., & Byblow, W. D. (2019). Neurophysiological mechanisms underlying motor skill learning in young and older adults. Experimental brain research, 237 (9), 2331-2344. 10.1007/s00221-019-05599-8
    Other University of Auckland co-authors: Winston Byblow
  • Trudgen, A., Cirillo, J., & Byblow, W. D. (2019). Somatosensory and transcranial direct current stimulation effects on manual dexterity and motor cortex function: A metaplasticity study. Brain stimulation, 12 (4), 938-947. 10.1016/j.brs.2019.02.010
    Other University of Auckland co-authors: Winston Byblow
  • Srzich, A. J., Cirillo, J., Stinear, J. W., Coxon, J. P., McMorland, A. J. C., & Anson, J. G. (2019). Does hypnotic susceptibility influence information processing speed and motor cortical preparatory activity?. Neuropsychologia, 129, 179-190. 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2019.03.014
    URL: http://hdl.handle.net/2292/47977
    Other University of Auckland co-authors: James Stinear, Angus McMorland, Greg Anson
  • Mooney, R. A., Ackerley, S. J., Rajeswaran, D. K., Cirillo, J., Barber, P. A., Stinear, C. M., & Byblow, W. D. (2019). The Influence of Primary Motor Cortex Inhibition on Upper Limb Impairment and Function in Chronic Stroke: A Multimodal Study. Neurorehabilitation and neural repair, 33 (2), 130-140. 10.1177/1545968319826052
    Other University of Auckland co-authors: Winston Byblow, Cathy Stinear, Alan Barber
  • Cirillo, J., Semmler, J. G., Mooney, R. A., & Byblow, W. D. (2018). Conventional or threshold-hunting TMS? A tale of two SICIs. Brain stimulation, 11 (6), 1296-1305. 10.1016/j.brs.2018.07.047
    Other University of Auckland co-authors: Winston Byblow
  • Mooney, R. A., Cirillo, J., & Byblow, W. D. (2018). Adaptive threshold hunting reveals differences in interhemispheric inhibition between young and older adults. The European journal of neuroscience, 48 (5), 2247-2258. 10.1111/ejn.14097
    Other University of Auckland co-authors: Winston Byblow

Identifiers

Contact details

Primary office location

BUILDING 907 - Bldg 907
Level 2, Room 226
368 KHYBER PASS
NEWMARKET
AUCKLAND 1023
New Zealand

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