Dr Richard Edlin

PhD 2004 (University of Sheffield); MA 1998, MCom 1996, BSc 1995 (all University of Canterbury)

Biography

I am a health economist with a broad interest in people's preferences and how they can 'fit' within the health system.  This includes the sorts of decisions that patients make when they choose whether a treatment is right for them. It is also relevant when they think about the sorts of sacrifices that they would make to get better health for themselves - health economists talk about this later type of preference as revealing 'health-related quality of life'.

More broadly, preferences are also relevant for other people too - clinicians, family members, citizens and decision makers all have a role to play within the health system.  For example, when making decisions other issues are often considered alongside the costs and health consequences of choosing one option over another.  Here, decision makers have to use their own judgements of how much different things are worth.


Alongside these broader questions, I also have experience in studies that look at a particular problem and explore which of the options is most likely to represent value for money. These studies have spanned both a range of clinical areas and patient groups from the very young to the very old.

Research | Current

Clinical areas in which I am currently or have previously provided input for economic evaluations include neonatal hypoglycaemia (within the hPOD trial for which this application seeks to extend data collection), diabetes mellitus (GEMS trial for gestational diabetes, (UK) NICE Guideline on Type 1 Diabetes in Adults), orthopaedic surgery (Warwick Arthroplasty Trial, Distal Radius Fracture and Fixation Trial), colorectal surgery (Fistula-in-ano-Trial, RoLARR trial), and oncology (within NICE technology appraisals).

Teaching | Current

POPLHLTH720: Cost-effectiveness Evaluation

Areas of expertise

  • Health economics
  • Health technology assessment
  • Quality of life

Selected publications and creative works (Research Outputs)

  • Jayne, D., Pigazzi, A., Marshall, H., Croft, J., Corrigan, N., Copeland, J., ... Thomassen, N. (2017). Effect of robotic-assisted vs conventional laparoscopic surgery on risk of conversion to open laparotomy among patients undergoing resection for rectal cancer: The ROLARR randomized clinical trial. JAMA, 318 (16), 1569-1580. 10.1001/jama.2017.7219

Identifiers

Contact details

Primary office location

TAMAKI BUILDING 730 - Bldg 730
Level 4, Room 451
TAMAKI CAMPUS GATE 1, 261 MORRIN RD
ST JOHNS
AUCKLAND 1072
New Zealand

Web links